Raspberry Sangria could be the start of a wonderful, relaxing weekend. Pureed raspberries give this sangria an extra fruity new twist. Champagne or sparkling mineral water can be substituted for the white wine.

Raspberry Sangria Prep Time: 15 min
Ready In: 15 min

Servings: 5

Ingredients
1 qt fresh or frozen, thawed Raspberries
1 qt dry White Wine
2/3 cup measurable Sweetener of choice
2 medium Oranges, cut into halves, sliced
1 medium Lime, cut into halves, sliced

Directions
Process raspberries in blender or food processor until smooth; strain and discard seeds.
Stir raspberry puree into wine in large pitcher. Stir in sweetener and fruit. Serve over ice in tall glasses.

Tips & Notes
One of the most fascinating new areas of raspberry research involves the potential for raspberries to improve management of obesity. Although this research is in its early stages, scientists now know that metabolism in our fat cells can be increased by phytonutrients found in raspberries.
Recent research on organic raspberries has now shown organic raspberries to be significantly higher in total antioxidant capacity than non-organic raspberries. This greater antioxidant capacity was associated with the greater levels of total phenols and total anthocyanins found in organic versus non-organic raspberries.
You’ll get significantly more antioxidant support by purchasing raspberries that are fully ripe.
Although it’s possible for raspberries to ripen after harvest, this fruit can be highly perishable and can mold quite easily at room temperature. So your most risk-free approach for getting optimal antioxidant benefits from raspberries is to purchase them at full maturity, keep them refrigerated at all times at temperatures between 35-39°F , and consume them very quickly (within a day or two after purchase).
Anti-cancer benefits of raspberries have long been attributed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients. In animal studies involving breast, cervical, colon, esophageal and prostate cancers, raspberry phytonutrients have been shown to play an important role in lowering oxidative stress, reducing inflammation, and thereby altering the development or reproduction of cancer cells. But new research in this area has shown that the anti-cancer benefits of raspberries may extend beyond their basic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory aspects. Phytonutrients in raspberries also may be able to change the signals that are sent to potential or existing cancer cells. In the case of existing cancer cells, phytonutrients like ellagitannins in raspberries may be able to decrease cancer cell numbers by sending signals that encourage the cancer cells to being a cycle of programmed cell death (apoptosis). In the case of potentially but not yet cancerous cells, phytonutrients in raspberries may be able to trigger signals that encourage the non-cancerous cells to remain non-cancerous.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 160
Total Fat: 0g
Saturated Fat: 0g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 10mg
Total Carbohydrates: 10g
Dietary Fiber: 3g
Protein: 1g

Source: DiabetesCare.net

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