Carrot Muffins can give your morning a kickstart, or to give yourself a boost with an afternoon snack. These muffins have no added fat and taste great.

Carrot Muffins Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 30 min
Ready In: 60 min

Servings: 12

Ingredients
1¾ cup Unbleached All-purpose Flour
¾ cup Granulated Sugar
½ cup Oat Bran
1 tsp Baking Soda
1 tsp Allspice
½ tsp Salt (optional)
½ tsp Baking Powder
12 oz pureed Carrots (baby food type) (2, 6 oz jars)
½ cup Egg Substitute (equal to 2 eggs)
½ cup Unsweetened Applesauce
½ cup Seedless Raisins
1 tsp Vanilla Extract

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray muffin tins with nonstick cooking spray.
In a medium bowl, combine flour, sugar, oat bran, baking soda, allspice, salt (optional) and baking powder.
In a larger bowl, mix carrots with remaining ingredients until well blended. Stir flour mixture into carrot mixture just until flour is moistened. Spoon batter into muffin tins. Bake for 30 minutes or until toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Tips & Notes
Carrots are vegetables that have many benefits that are very nutritious for our system. Carrots of course are orange in color and this stems from the carotenoids, which contain antioxidants.
As with any foods, they must be all taken in moderation and with care. Carrots contain a large amount of sugar, not good for diabetics. So are carrots bad for diabetics?
According to the glycemic index, carrots are almost identical to sugar, however scientists have since come up with a new way to measure and rank foods called the glycemic load.
The glycemic load tells you how much sugar is in your food instead of telling you how high it will raise your blood sugar levels (glycemic index).
The other benefit of carrots is that they contain a small amount of lecithin that is helpful in lowering your cholesterol levels. Another benefit is that carrots provide similar protective and therapeutic benefits of ginseng.
Carrots are known as the poor man’s ginseng because it contains more than 490 phytochemicals.
So are carrots bad for diabetics? It appears not, eaten in moderation.
One of the most important antioxidants in carrots are beta-carotenes, these help the immune system the ability to target and destroy cancer cells in your body, as well as protecting your cells against free radicals.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 163
Total Fat: 1g
Saturated Fat: 0g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 140mg
Total Carbohydrates: 36g
Dietary Fiber: 1g
Sugars: 16g
Protein: 4g

Source: DiabetesCare.net

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