Chicken Broccoli Casserole

This Chicken Broccoli Casserole tastes a lot like comfort food, the kind of comfort food that your mom used to make. And to make it even better, this dish is healthy.

Chicken Broccoli CasserolePrep Time: 20 min
Cook Time: 45 min
Ready In: 65 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
2 cups Broccoli
½ lb (8 oz) Cooked Chopped Chicken
½ cup Skim Milk
⅛ cup (2 tbsp) Real Mayonnaise
¼ tsp Curry to eat Powder
1 can Condensed Cream of Chicken Soup (follow recipe)
1 tbsp Lemon Juice
½ cup (2 oz) grated Cheddar Cheese
½ cup Bread Crumbs
1 tsp Melted Butter
1 tsp Olive Oil

Directions
Preheat oven to 350°F. Treat 11-inch × 7-inch casserole dish with nonstick spray.
Steam broccoli until tender; drain.
Spread out chicken on bottom of dish; cover with steamed broccoli.
In medium bowl, combine milk, mayonnaise, curry powder, soup, and lemon juice; pour over broccoli.
In small bowl, mix together cheese, bread crumbs, butter, and oil; sprinkle over top of casserole. Bake 30 minutes.

Tips & Notes
Broccoli is known as being one of the world’s best super foods. But while everyone knows it’s good for you, few know exactly why it’s good for you. If they did, perhaps more people would willingly eat it.
Broccoli’s main health benefit is it provides substantial protection from free radicals.
Research also shows broccoli contains sulphurophanes, and other types of phytonutrients that helps to protect your body from cancer. These components remove harmful toxins from your body and help restore overall good health.
Broccoli also provides protection for your blood vessels. When blood vessels become damaged, the risk of the individual developing heart disease increases four-fold. Although this type of damage also can be caused by your diet, lack of exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, stress and genetics. Another major contributor to heart disease is type 2 diabetes.
Since having type 2 diabetes dramatically increases the risk of developing free radicals, now the odds are really stacked against you.
Free radicals go to work to tear down and destroy your body. Free radicals can lead to cancer, cause the body to age prematurely and unnecessarily wear out the body. Studies show that just consuming regular amounts of broccoli reduces this effect by a whopping 75 percent.
Besides its attack on free radicals, broccoli also contains substantial amounts of helpful vitamins and nutrients. Some of the most abundant are magnesium, thiamine, iron, calcium, phosphate, zinc riboflavin, folate and niacin, as well as an ample supply of vitamins B6 and vitamin C.
Need more reasons to eat broccoli? Broccoli contains protein, is low in carbs and is fat-free. How much healthier can you get?

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 328
Protein: 26g
Carbohydrates: 20g
Fat: 17g
Saturated Fat: 6g
Cholesterol: 67mg
Sodium: 254mg
Fiber: 3g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Mock Chorizo

This Mock Chorizo recipe will provide all the flavor of real chorizo without the fat and calories. And the cool part is, your taste buds will not know the difference. Oh, and plan ahead. This won’t be ready to eat today.

Mock Chorizo Prep Time: 30 min
Ready In: 4 days

Servings: Makes about 2 lbs, serving size is 2 ounces

Ingredients
2 lb (32 oz) Lean Pork
4 tbsp Chili Powder
¼ tsp Ground Cloves
2 tbsp Paprika
2½ tsp crushed Fresh Garlic
1 tsp crushed Dried Oregano
3½ tbsp Cider Vinegar
1 tsp Kosher or Sea Salt (optional)

Directions

Remove all fat from meat; cut the meat into cubes.
Put meat in food processor; grind to desired consistency. Add remaining ingredients; mix until well blended.
Tradition calls for aging this sausage in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 4 days before cooking. Leftover sausage can be stored in the freezer up to 3 months.

Tips & Notes
Traditionally, chorizo is very high in fat. The chorizo recipes in this section are lower-fat alternatives. They make excellent replacements for adding flavor to recipes that call for bacon.
In fact, one or two ounces of chorizo can replace an entire pound of bacon in cabbage, bean or potato soup.
Chorizo, a highly spiced Spanish sausage often flavored with garlic, is suitable for eating alone or incorporated into recipes, such as egg dishes and casseroles. This sausage imparts a variety of value for a healthy meal plan, including protein, vitamins and minerals.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 137
Protein: 15g
Carbohydrates: 1g
Fat: 8g
Saturated Fat: 3g
Cholesterol: 45mg
Sodium: 27mg

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Tuscan Pasta Fagioli

Tuscan Pasta Fagioli is a traditional Italian comfort food soup. This version is a favorite in Tuscany. Chances are, it will become a favorite in your part of the world, too.

Tuscan Pasta Fagioli Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 45 min
Ready In: 60 min

Servings: 6

Ingredients
2 tbsp Olive Oil
⅓ cup Onion, chopped
3 cloves Garlic, minced
½ lb Tomatoes, peeled and chopped
5 cups low-sodium Vegetable Stock
¼ tsp fresh Ground Black Pepper
3 cups Cannellini Beans, rinsed and drained
2½ cups Whole-grain Pasta Shells
2 tbsp Parmesan Cheese

Directions
Heat olive oil in large pot; gently cook onions and garlic until soft but not browned. Add tomatoes, vegetable stock and pepper.
Purée 1½ cups of cannellini beans in food processor or blender; add to stock. Cover and simmer 20 to 30 minutes.
While stock is simmering, cook pasta until al dente; drain. Add remaining beans and pasta to stock; heat through. Serve with Parmesan cheese.

Tips & Notes
It is a rare human being who can walk into a room where a pot of soup is cooking and not be transported by the aroma. For many of us, smell is the sense of the imagination and of love. Our instincts, intuitions and memory are all triggered by our sense of smell.
Soups, perhaps more than any other food, have an uncanny effect on our mood and memory. What is it about soups that enable them to have this almost universal effect of rekindling memories of childhood, of feeling safe and taken care of?
Perhaps it is the length of time it takes for a soup to cook, or the anticipation of the ensuing comfort of eating something that requires so little effort on our parts. Or perhaps because soup recipes are so very particular to every family — a unique blend of vegetables, spices, methods and motions going back generations.
It’s not hard to imagine how a soup like this might become inextricably entwined with memories of a childhood in Tuscany. Imagine coming home on a foggy winter evening, the dampness of the air chilling you from head to toe, the familiar odor of the canal’s perpetual stew mingling with the cold.
But suddenly, you catch a whiff of a delicious aroma in the street. The closer you get to your door, the surer you are that it’s your mother’s soup, and not your neighbor’s.
When at last the warm walls of your home greet you, with barely a “ciao” to your mother, you make a beeline to the stove for final confirmation: indeed your favorite soup is simmering.
But it’s not only Tuscans who love this soup. Pasta e Fagioli, with some variations, exists in every region of Italy and it’s probably safe to say that every single household has its own variation.
And now, you can too.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 317
Protein: 15g
Carbohydrates: 54g
Fat: 6g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 2mg
Sodium: 248mg
Fiber: 11g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Baked Stuffed Kibbeh

Baked Stuffed Kibbeh is a Middle Eastern dish that traditionally consists of a wheat and meat, dough-like shell and a spiced meat center. Ground lamb is most often used, and it has a high omega-3 content.

Baked Stuffed KibbehPrep Time: 20 min
Cook Time: 45 min
Ready In: 65 min

Servings: 8

Ingredients
Cooking Spray
¾ cup Bulgur Wheat, fine grind
2 cups Boiling Water
1 lb Lean Ground Lamb
1 cup Onion, grated
1 tsp Salt
¼ tsp fresh Ground Black Pepper
Small bowl Ice Water
1½ tbsp Butter
¼ cup Pine Nuts
¼ tsp Cinnamon
¼ tsp Allspice
1½ tbsp Butter

Directions
Spray 9-inch × 9-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
Put bulgur wheat in small bowl. Cover with boiling water and allow wheat to absorb liquid, approximately 15 to 20 minutes.
Line colander with small piece of cheesecloth. Drop bulgur wheat into cloth; drain and squeeze as much liquid out of wheat as possible.
On large cutting board, combine lamb, ½ grated onions, wheat, salt and pepper; mix with hands, kneading together all ingredients.
Divide meat mixture in half. Place half in bottom of baking dish by dipping hands into ice water to spread meat mixture smoothly over bottom of dish. Cover bottom of dish completely.
In a small pan, melt 1½ tablespoons of butter; sauté remaining onions, pine nuts, cinnamon and allspice until onions are soft.
Spread onion and pine nut mixture evenly over first layer of meat in baking dish. Take remaining half of meat mixture and spread smoothly on top, using procedure in Step 5.
Score top in diamond shapes with a knife dipped in cold water. Melt remaining 1½ tablespoons of butter; drizzle over top of meat.
Bake at 350°F for approximately 40 to 45 minutes, or until golden brown.

Tips & Notes
When thinking about omega-3 fats and the availability from plants versus animals, nuts and seeds come to mind on the plant side of things and fish on the animal side.
But on the animal side of things, think about grass-fed lamb. The omega-3 content of lamb depends upon the young sheep’s diet as well as the mother’s diet, but when those diets are nutritionally supportive, the result can be a cut of lamb with an impressive amount of omega-3s.
Unless you have a butcher, very lean ground lamb is difficult to find. Make it yourself using chunks of meat trimmed from a leg of lamb. Be sure to remove all visible fat from the lamb and grind twice using a medium or fine grinder blade. Removing all visible fat prevents lamb from having a strong “mutton” taste.
Although kibbeh is often made with a shell and filling, it can be made as patties or in pie form as well. The filling is usually cooked before being placed in the doughy shell, and then the kibbeh is normally fried.


Nutritional Information Per Serving

Calories: 226
Protein: 18g
Carbohydrates: 13g
Fat: 12g
Saturated Fat: 4g
Cholesterol: 62mg
Sodium: 343mg
Fiber: 3g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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