Roasted Butternut Squash Pasta

Roasted Butternut Squash Pasta makes for a nutritious, delicious meal. If you are not eating thick-skinned squash (butternut, acorn, spaghetti), you are missing out on a whole world of taste sensation with healthy benefits.

Roasted Butternut Squash PastaPrep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 1 hr, 15 min
Ready In: 1 hr, 30 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 Butternut Squash
4 tsp Extra-virgin Olive Oil
1 clove Garlic, minced
1 cup Red Onion, chopped
2 tsp Red Wine Vinegar
¼ tsp dried Oregano
2 cups cooked Pasta
Fresh Ground Black Pepper (optional)

Directions
Preheat oven to 400°F. Cut squash in half and scoop out seeds. Using nonstick spray, coat one side of two pieces of heavy-duty foil large enough to wrap squash halves.
Wrap squash in foil; place on a baking sheet. Bake one hour, or until tender.
Scoop out baked squash flesh and discard rind; rough-chop.
Add olive oil, garlic and onion to nonstick skillet; sauté for about 5 minutes until onion is transparent. (Alternatively, put oil, garlic, and onion in covered microwave-safe dish; microwave on high 2 to 3 minutes.)
Remove pan from heat; stir in vinegar and oregano. Add squash; stir to coat in onion mixture.
Add pasta; toss to mix. Season with fresh ground black pepper, if desired.

Tips & Notes
For added flavor, use roasted instead of raw garlic. Roasting garlic causes it to caramelize, adding a natural sweetness.
Butternut squash is one of the most common varieties of winter squash. Like other winter squash, it has a hard exterior and firm flesh and is chock full of vitamin A, potassium and fiber.
Contrary to the name, winter squash is grown in the summer and harvested in the fall. Due to its thick, tough exterior, it can be stored for several months and eaten during the winter season.
One cup of butternut squash provides a whopping 437 percent of your vitamin A needs for the day, as well as 52 percent of vitamin C and 10 percent or more of vitamin E, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, pantothenic acid, magnesium and manganese. It also is an excellent source of potassium; even more than a banana.
Type 1 diabetics who consume high-fiber diets have lower overall blood sugar levels, while type 2 diabetics have improved blood sugar, lipids and insulin levels. One cup of butternut squash provides about 6.6 grams of fiber out of the recommended 21 to 25 g/day for women and 30 to 38 g/day for men.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 216
Protein: 5g
Carbohydrates: 40g
Fat: 5g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 8mg
Fiber: 2g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Tomatoes Stuffed with Quinoa Salad

Tomatoes Stuffed with Quinoa Salad is a delicious way to add this nutritional powerhouse to your diet. This delicious, nutty-tasting seed blends with many other flavors to create something that is out of this world.

quinoa stuffed tomatoesPrep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 15 min
Ready In: 30 min

Servings: 6

Ingredients
½ cup Quinoa (KEEN-WAH)
1 cup Water
6 large (3 lb) Tomatoes
1½ cup Cucumber, peeled and finely diced
⅓ cup fresh Parsley, chopped
¼ cup fresh Mint, chopped
½ cup Red Onion, finely chopped
3 tbsp Feta Cheese, crumbled
2 tbsp Lemon Juice
3 tbsp Olive Oil

Directions
Rinse quinoa in fine mesh strainer before cooking. To cook: Place quinoa and water in small saucepan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and cook until all water is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Cool.
Prepare tomatoes: remove caps and hollow out, leaving shell about ½-inch thick.
In mixing bowl, combine quinoa, cucumbers, parsley, mint, red onion and feta cheese.
Mix lemon juice and olive oil together; pour over quinoa and vegetables.
Stuff tomatoes with mixture and serve.

Tips & Notes
According to the American Diabetes.com, this little seed is a wonderful addition to any healthy diet because it is rich in protein and fiber.
Although quinoa is typically considered a grain, it is actually the seed of a plant that is related to spinach, beets and Swiss chard. When cooked, it has a fluffy, creamy consistency similar to rice or couscous. It is slightly crunchy with a light nutty flavor. Quinoa is gaining in popularity and may be found in health food stores or the health food section of your local grocery store.
Quinoa is loaded with essential nutrients, so many consider it a heart-healthy superfood. The protein it supplies is a complete protein, which means that it contains a full profile of all nine essential amino acids. Like tomatoes, quinoa is especially rich in the amino acid lysine, which promotes tissue growth and repair.
Because this seed is packed with essential amino acids, it is an excellent source of protein and it also is gluten-free and easy to digest.
In addition to protein, quinoa is high in fiber so it will satisfy your appetite and help you control portion sizes.
Quinoa also contains minerals such as manganese, magnesium, iron, copper and phosphorus, which are valuable nutrients for people with diabetes, heart disease and migraine headaches.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 180
Protein: 5g
Carbohydrates: 24g
Fat: 9g
Saturated Fat: 2g
Cholesterol: 4mg
Sodium: 78mg
Fiber: 4g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Vegetable Frittata

A Vegetable Frittata is one of those foods that you make enough of, and then you have it all week long. The health benefits of asparagus means this should be in your kitchen at all times.

Vegetable Frittata Prep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 10 min
Ready In: 25 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1½ tbsp Olive Oil
4 oz Red Pepper, chopped
3 large Eggs
4 oz Egg Substitute (or egg whites)
4 oz Asparagus, cut diagonally in 1-inch pieces
¾ cup Potatoes, cooked and cubed
⅓ cup Feta Cheese, crumbled
1 tsp Oregano

Directions
Preheat oven to 350°F.
Using ovenproof nonstick skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add red peppers; cook until softened.
In medium bowl, beat together eggs and egg substitute. Add asparagus, potatoes, feta and oregano.
Pour eggs into skillet; gently stir until eggs on bottom of pan begin to set. Gently pull cooked eggs from side of skillet, allowing liquid uncooked egg on top to come in contact with heated skillet. Repeat, working all around skillet, until most of eggs on top have begun to set.
Transfer skillet to oven; bake until top is set and dry to the touch, about 3 to 5 minutes.
Loosen frittata around edges of skillet and invert onto serving plate.

Tips & Notes
If you have type 2 diabetes then you know that watching your carbohydrate intake is very important for good blood glucose management.
Increasing your intake of vegetables is a great way to keep control of your calories and carbs. Veggies such as asparagus are naturally low carb and have a low glycemic index.
Asparagus adds a touch of class to any meal and is high in fiber. Steamed, sautéed or stir-fried, asparagus brings a lot to the table, providing a rich source of vitamins A, B, C, and K as well as iron and other essential minerals.
One important benefit of asparagus is for regulating blood sugar. It contains the trace mineral chromium, which enhances the ability of insulin to transport glucose from the bloodstream into cells.
Some studies further suggest that it can improve insulin secretion and improve beta-cell function thereby lowering the risk of acquiring type 2 diabetes.
Moreover, it also helps decrease the risk of getting kidney stone because the vegetable is a natural diuretic which helps flushing out fluid and excess salts to help prevent high blood pressure or other heart-related diseases.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 171
Protein: 12g
Carbohydrates: 11g
Fat: 9g
Saturated Fat: 4g
Cholesterol: 195mg
Sodium: 252mg
Fiber: 2g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Smoked Shrimp and Cheese Quesadillas

Smoked Shrimp and Cheese Quesadillas will get your family and friends to the table in a hurry. Just the aroma will draw them in. Let the taste keep them coming back.

Smoked Shrimp and Cheese Quesadillas Prep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 3 to 5 min for each Quesadilla
Ready In: 15 min or so

Servings: 4

Ingredients
4 (8-inch) Flour Tortillas
4 tsp Olive Oil
2 oz Part-skim Mozzarella or other mild cheese (such as Fontina or Baby Swiss)
1 Jalapeño or Banana Pepper, finely chopped
2 cloves Garlic, crushed
4 oz Smoked Shrimp
1 cup Red Onion, thinly sliced
½ cup roughly chopped fresh Cilantro

Directions
Preheat oven to 375°F.
Lightly brush 1 side of each tortilla with some olive oil.
Mix cheese, pepper and garlic with remaining olive oil; spread ¼ of cheese mixture in center of oiled half of each tortilla. Top with shrimp, red onion and cilantro; fold tortilla in half to cover ingredients.
Place tortillas in baking pan treated with nonstick spray.
Bake 3 to 5 minutes, or until nicely browned and cheese is melted. Serve with your choice of tomato salsa.

Tips & Notes
With its low calorie content – a generous 6-ounce portion provides just 202 calories – shrimp is a smart addition to calorie- and health-conscious diets.
It’s also relatively low in mercury, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Food and Drug Administration. Furthermore, the American Heart Association notes that you can consume up to 6 ounces of cooked fish, shellfish and poultry daily.
Add shrimp to your diet and you’ll boost your intake of zinc and selenium, two minerals your cells need for the activation of enzymes — proteins that help your cells perform chemical reactions.
Eat shrimp and you’ll support healthy red blood cells as a result of its vitamin content. The vitamin A in shrimp controls red blood cell development; it activates genes that growing cells need to develop from stem cells into functional red blood cells. It also helps your red blood cells access the iron they need to transport oxygen.
Shrimp offers several nutritional advantages as a result of its protein, vitamin and mineral content, but consuming shrimp also has its disadvantages.
Shrimp is high in sodium and cholesterol. A 6-ounce portion of shrimp contains 359 milligrams of cholesterol, which is more than the recommended daily intake limit.
Shrimp also contain 1,610 milligrams of sodium per serving, or 70 percent of your upper intake limit. Dietary cholesterol poses a potential threat because of its ability to increase blood cholesterol levels, especially in people sensitive to it.
Reduce sodium content (salty flavor) from seafood like shrimp by rinsing them in water.
When you are uncertain about a food and its impact on your diabetes, always consult your doctor before consuming questionable foods.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 272
Protein: 11g
Carbohydrates: 32g
Fat: 11g
Saturated Fat: 3g
Cholesterol: 39mg
Sodium: 428mg
Fiber: 3g

Source: NetPlaces.com
http://netplaces.com/diabetic-recipes

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