Ham and Artichoke Hearts

Ham and Artichoke Hearts Scalloped Potatoes has a lot of different flavors coming together. When they do, your mouth will enjoy the result.

Ham and Artichoke HeartsPrep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 50 min
Ready In: 75 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
2 cups frozen Artichoke Hearts
1 cup chopped Onion
4 small Potatoes, thinly sliced
Sea Salt and freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste (optional)
1 tbsp Lemon Juice
1 tbsp Dry White Wine
1 cup Mock Cream (recipe below)
½ cup non-fat Cottage Cheese
1 tsp dried Parsley
1 tsp Garlic Powder
⅛ cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese
¼ lb (4 oz) Lean Ham, cubed
2 oz Cheddar Cheese, grated (to yield ½ cup)

Mock Cream
Ingredients
1 cup Skim Milk
¼ cup Non-fat Dry Milk
Directions
Process ingredients in blender until mixed. Use as a substitute for heavy cream.
Yield: 1¼ cups

Directions
Preheat oven to 300°F.
Thaw artichoke hearts and pat dry with a paper towel.
In deep casserole dish treated with nonstick spray, layer artichokes, onion and potatoes; lightly sprinkle salt and pepper over top (if using).
In a food processor or blender, combine lemon juice, wine, Mock Cream, cottage cheese, parsley, garlic powder and Parmesan cheese; process until smooth. Pour over layered vegetables; top with ham.
Cover casserole dish (with a lid or foil); bake 35 to 40 minutes, or until potatoes are cooked through.
Remove cover; top with Cheddar cheese. Return to oven another 10 minutes, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Let rest 10 minutes before cutting.

Tips & Notes
Artichoke hearts can be expensive. You can substitute cabbage, broccoli, or cauliflower (or a mixture of all 3) for the artichokes.
Artichoke is a diuretic vegetable. Diuretics are substances that promote an increased flow of urine and thereby aid the removal of fluids from the body.
According to the Dasman Diabetes Institute, artichokes have been shown to raise the HDL (good cholesterol)/LDL (bad cholesterol) ratio, which in turn diminishes the risk of arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and coronary heart disease.
They also contain bioactive agents that have antioxidant and anticancer properties.
In terms of nutritional value, artichokes are an excellent source of fiber, which helps to keep bowels healthy and stop constipation; and folate, which works to help form healthy red blood cells and reduces the risk of neural tube defects such as spina bifida in unborn babies.
They also are a good source of other nutrients such as vitamin C, magnesium and phosphorus.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (without salt)
Calories: 269
Protein: 21g
Carbohydrates: 31g
Fat: 8g
Saturated Fat: 4g
Cholesterol: 28mg
Sodium: 762mg
Fiber: 6g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Pork Roast

Pork Roast with Caramelized Onions and Apples will be one of those dishes your family will want over and over, so put it on the most favored list.

Pork Roast Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 75 min
Ready In: 90 min

Servings: 6

Ingredients
2 lbs Lean Pork Loin Roast
Fresh Ground Black Pepper
½ tbsp Olive Oil
½ tbsp Butter
2 cups Onion, chopped
1 tbsp Marsala Wine
⅓ cup low-sodium Chicken Broth
1 Apple, peeled and chopped

Directions
Preheat oven to 375°F. Season pork loin with pepper. Heat olive oil in a large skillet; sear to brown all sides.
Transfer roast to 9-inch × 13-inch glass baking dish; place in oven for approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.
While pork is roasting, prepare onions: In large nonstick skillet, melt butter and add onions. Sauté onions until soft; add wine, chicken broth and apple. Continue cooking on low heat until onions are soft, brown in color and have caramelized.
When roast has reached an internal temperature of 130°F, spoon onions over top; place a loose foil tent over roast.
Remove roast from oven when an internal temperature of 145°F has been reached. (Temperature of roast will continue to rise as meat rests.)
Keep roast loosely covered with foil and allow to stand for 10 to 15 minutes before slicing.

Tips & Notes
It’s called the “other” white meat because there are certain cuts of pork that qualify as a lean protein. Particularly pork tenderloin, generally referred to as pork loin, is an excellent lean protein with fat burning properties.
Forget what you think you know about pork, because pork loin nutrition facts reveal a much healthier option than you might have believed.
Pork often gets a bad reputation, but lean cuts such as pork tenderloin offer surprising health benefits.
One serving of pork loin is 4 ounces and has 121 calories per serving. Pork loin has a low fat count — just 4 grams per serving — no carbs and no fiber. But what it also shows is an amazing 22 grams of protein per 4 ounces of pork loin!
Pork loins also provide us with plenty of essential vitamins, with high levels of thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, riboflavin and 8 percent of your daily value of vitamin B12. These vitamins are essential for successful fat loss as well as improved health.
When it comes to minerals, pork loin nutrition facts are packed with them all. Phosphorus, potassium, selenium and zinc are found in large numbers in one serving of pork loin, while calcium, iron, magnesium and manganese are found in lower — but not insignificant — quantities.
The health benefits of pork loin includes fat burning, according to FatBurningFurnace.com, because pork requires your body to work really hard just to digest it and lean pork like pork loin – with 22 grams of protein– allows greater fat burning. So unlike bacon and ham, lean pork actually does more to help your body burn excess fat.
There are plenty of health benefits of pork derived from the most prominent vitamins and minerals in each serving. Iron for example, helps keep your energy levels high while building red blood cells to stave off illness and boost immunity.
The B vitamins also adds many health benefits to pork loin, including producing healthy nerve tissue, transport amino acids, helps the nervous system function properly and maintains healthy digestion. Niacin, a B vitamin, also helps maintain healthy skin while releasing energy from the foods you eat … like pork loin.
Many of the vitamins and minerals give pork loin many of its health benefits, including improved heart health and a reduction in high blood pressure as well as cholesterol.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 373
Protein: 31g
Carbohydrates: 8g
Fat: 23g
Saturated Fat: 9g
Cholesterol: 96mg
Sodium: 156mg
Fiber: 1g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Pasta with Creamed Clam Sauce

Pasta with Creamed Clam Sauce, besides having great flavor, provides an excellent supply of manganese that plays an important part in regulating blood sugar levels.

Pasta with Creamed Clam Sauce Prep Time: 15 min
Cook Time: 6 min
Ready In: 25 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 (6½ oz) can Chopped Clams
4 tsp Olive Oil
1 clove Garlic, minced
1 tbsp Dry White Wine or Dry Vermouth
½ cup Mock Cream (recipe below)
¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese
2 cups cooked Pasta
Freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste (optional)

Mock Cream
Ingredients
1 cup Skim Milk
¼ cup Non-fat Dry Milk
Directions
Process ingredients in blender until mixed. Use as a substitute for heavy cream.
Yield: 1¼ cups

Directions
Drain clams; reserve juice.
Heat olive oil in large nonstick skillet. Add garlic; sauté 1 minute; stir in clams and sauté another minute.
With slotted spoon, transfer clams to a bowl; cover to keep warm.
Add wine and reserved clam juice to skillet; bring to a boil and reduce by half. Lower heat and add Mock Cream; cook for about 2 to 3 minutes, being careful not to boil cream.
Stir in Parmesan cheese; continue to heat another minute, stirring constantly.
Toss sauce with pasta; divide into four equal servings.
Top each serving with a tablespoon of Parmesan cheese and freshly ground black pepper, if desired.

Tips & Notes
Clams are a low fat, high protein seafood choice with an above average amount of healthful minerals such as selenium, zinc, iron and magnesium and B vitamins like niacin.
Clams come in many product forms. The whole form, known as shellstock (both shells intact), is available fresh and preferably alive or sometimes frozen. The form is eaten raw, steamed or added to various recipes that include the shells for appearance. The half-shell form (top shell removed) can be provided fresh or frozen and some come topped with flavorings or stuffing.
When buying fresh whole clams, it is important to make sure that they are alive. The shells of live clams should be tightly closed or try to close when tapped or agitated.
A tradition in the U.S. is to eat clams raw on the half shell. Although state and federal regulatory authorities have extensive programs in place to ensure that live bivalves are safe to eat, the system is not perfect and the risk of foodborne illness for these products is higher than for cooked foods.
Health authorities have advised high risk individuals, including young children, elderly adults, pregnant women and any person with a compromised immune system not to eat raw animal products like meat, poultry, shellfish like oysters and clams, and eggs which may contain potentially harmful viruses or bacteria for decades.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 226
Protein: 15g
Carbohydrates: 24g
Fat: 7g
Saturated Fat: 2g
Cholesterol: 25mg
Sodium: 209mg
Fiber: 1g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Lentil Soup with Herbs and Lemon

Lentil Soup with Herbs and Lemon is a delicious, quick meal that will help reduce cholesterol levels as well as help control blood sugar levels.

Lentil Soup with Herbs and LemonPrep Time: 15 min (after soaking lentils overnight)
Cook Time: 20
Ready In: 40 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 cup Lentils, soaked overnight in 1 cup water
6 cups low-fat, reduced-sodium Chicken Broth
1 Carrot, sliced
1 stalk Celery, sliced
1 yellow Onion, thinly sliced
2 tsp Olive Oil
1 tbsp dried Tarragon
½ tsp dried Oregano
Sea salt and fresh Ground Black Pepper, to taste (optional)
1 tbsp Lemon Juice
4 thin slices of Lemon

Directions
Drain and rinse lentils. Add lentils and broth to pot over medium heat; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until tender, approximately 15 minutes. (If you did not presoak the lentils, increase cooking time by about 15 more minutes.)
While lentils are cooking, sauté carrot, celery, and onion in oil for 8 minutes, or until onion is golden brown. Remove from heat and set aside.
When lentils are tender, add vegetables, tarragon, oregano and salt and pepper, if using; cook for 2 minutes. Stir in lemon juice.
Ladle into 4 serving bowls; garnish with lemon slices.

Tips & Notes
Compared to other types of dried beans, lentils are relatively quick and easy to prepare. They readily absorb a variety of wonderful flavors from other foods and seasonings, are high in nutritional value and are available throughout the year.
Lentils are legumes along with other types of beans. They grow in pods that contain either one or two lentil seeds that are round, oval or heart-shaped disks and are oftentimes smaller than the tip of a pencil eraser. They may be sold whole or split into halves with the brown and green varieties being the best at retaining their shape after cooking.
Lentils, a small but nutritionally mighty member of the legume family, are a very good source of cholesterol-lowering fiber. Not only do lentils help lower cholesterol, they are of special benefit in managing blood-sugar disorders since their high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising rapidly after a meal.
In addition to its beneficial effects on the digestive system and the heart, soluble fiber helps stabilize blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, hypoglycemia or diabetes, legumes like lentils can really help you balance blood sugar levels while providing steady, slow-burning energy.
Studies of high fiber diets and blood sugar levels have shown the dramatic benefits provided by these high fiber foods. Researchers compared two groups of people with type 2 diabetes who were fed different amounts of high fiber foods.
One group ate the standard American Diabetic diet, which contains with 24 grams of fiber/day, while the other group ate a diet containing 50 grams of fiber/day.
Those who ate the diet higher in fiber had lower levels of both plasma glucose (blood sugar) and insulin (the hormone that helps blood sugar get into cells). The high fiber group also reduced their total cholesterol by nearly 7 percent.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 214
Protein: 15g
Carbohydrates: 34g
Fat: 3g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 353mg
Fiber: 16g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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