Pasta with Tuna Alfredo Sauce

Pasta with Tuna Alfredo Sauce may knock your socks off. Make sure you’re barefoot when you taste all the deliciousness this dish will bring to the table.

Pasta with Tuna Alfredo SaucePrep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 15 min
Ready In: 25 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
1 cup Non-fat Cottage Cheese
1 tbsp Skim Milk
2 tbsp Olive Oil
1 clove Garlic, minced
2 (6 oz) cans Tuna packed in water, drained
⅛ cup (2 tbsp) Dry White Wine
¼ cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese
2 cups Cooked Pasta

Directions
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste (optional)
Process cottage cheese and skim milk in food processor or blender until smooth. Set aside.
Heat olive oil in large nonstick skillet. Add garlic; sauté 1 minute. Stir in tuna; sauté another minute.
Add wine to skillet; bring to a boil. Lower heat; add cottage cheese mixture. Cook for about 5 minutes, being careful not to let it boil.
Stir in Parmesan; continue to heat 1 minute, stirring constantly.
Add pasta; toss with sauce.
Divide into 4 equal servings; serve immediately, topped with freshly ground pepper, if desired.

Tips & Notes
According to Health Diaries, tuna is an incredibly nutrient-dense food. It’s rich in high quality protein and an excellent source of important nutrients such as the minerals selenium, magnesium and potassium; not to mention the B vitamin complex, and of course, the marvelous omega-3 essential fatty acids.
The omega-3 fatty acids in tuna help the cardiovascular system by aiding in the prevention of irregular heart rhythms, making blood clots less likely, and improving the ratio of good (HDL) cholesterol to potentially harmful (LDL) cholesterol.
Tuna is of particular benefit to people who suffer from type 2 diabetes, due to its high content of omega-3 fats. Research suggests that although saturated fats promote weight gain, the omega-3 fats found in tuna reduce the chances of becoming obese along with improving the ability of the body to respond to insulin.
The reason for this marvelous ability is the omega 3 fatty acid known as EPA, which stimulates the secretion of the hormone leptin, thereby regulating body weight and metabolism.
A diet high in tuna may improve your mood and save you stress. The EPA of Omega-3 fatty acids improves flow of blood and may affect both hormones and the immune system, each of which have an important effect on brain function.
DHA is used in ion channels in the brain, helping transmit electrical signals, and is involved in serotonin metabolism, a key factor in depression.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 278
Protein: 33g
Carbohydrates: 21g
Fat: 5g
Saturated Fat: 2g
Cholesterol: 32mg
Sodium: 401mg
Fiber: 1g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Egg White Pancakes

Egg White Pancakes are a healthy alternative to using the egg yolks, but the eggs still are packed with lean protein while eliminating the cholesterol in the yolks.

Egg White Pancakes Prep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 5 min
Ready In: 15 min

Servings: 2

Ingredients
4 Egg Whites
½ cup Oatmeal
4 tsp reduced-calorie or low-sugar Strawberry Jam
1 tsp Powdered Sugar

Directions
Put all ingredients in blender; process until smooth.
Preheat nonstick pan treated with cooking spray over medium heat. Pour half of mixture into pan; cook for 4 to 5 minutes.
Flip pancake and cook until inside is cooked. Repeat using remaining batter for second pancake.
Dust each pancake with powdered sugar, if using.

Tips & Notes
Creative Toppings
Experiment with toast and pancake toppings. Try a tablespoon of raisins, almonds, apples, bananas, berries, nut butters (limit these to 1 teaspoon per serving), peanuts, pears, walnuts, or wheat germ.
Eggs often have a bad reputation, thanks to their high amounts of cholesterol and fat. While eggs’ high cholesterol content only presents a health risk to a subset of the population – those sensitive to dietary cholesterol – using egg whites in place of whole eggs still offers health benefits. While the egg white may not look like it’s packed full of nutrients, it does offer several benefits without a lot of calories.
An egg is full of cholesterol, with a single, large egg weighing in with nearly as much cholesterol recommended in your full day’s diet. The full 213 mg of an egg’s cholesterol, however, is all in the yolk.
Eat only the egg white and you’re instantly removing the eggs’ notoriously detrimental element.
People with no health problems should eat no more than 300 mg of cholesterol per day, while those suffering from conditions such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease should eat no more than 200 mg of cholesterol per day.
Egg whites are one of the top sources of protein, ranking up there with lean meat, poultry and fish. More than half of a full egg’s 6 g of protein, in fact, comes from the white. A single egg white offers 4 g of protein without the yolk’s fat and other detriments.
You’ll get no fat, in fact, unless you fry up the egg in greasy oil or butter. Opting for low-fat protein sources as a regular part of your diet can also reduce your risk of heart disease.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 197
Protein: 13g
Carbohydrates: 31g
Fat: 3g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 120mg
Fiber: 4g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Fruit Compote

Fruit Compote is a delicious combination of your favorite, healthy fruit. The fiber in apples is great for helping to control blood sugar levels.

Fruit CompotePrep Time: 10 min
Cook Time: 15 min
Ready In: 25 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
2 cups Apples, chopped
2 tbsp dried Cranberries
6 dried Apricots, diced
¼ tsp Cinnamon
2 tbsp Water
1 tbsp Brandy (optional; if not used, add additional 3 tbsp water)
1 tbsp Walnuts, finely chopped

Directions
Combine apples, cranberries, apricots, cinnamon, water and brandy in small saucepan.
Cook over medium heat until apples are softened, about 10 minutes.
Remove from heat and cover 5 minutes. Stir in walnuts before serving.

Tips & Notes
Apples are undeniably good for you – especially if you have diabetes. Soluble fiber content is the biggest focus for diabetic nutrition facts about apples, and the main reason why diabetic apple recipes are so good for type 2 diabetics.
Apples are high in the soluble fiber pectin, making them good at controlling blood sugar by releasing it a little more slowly into the bloodstream. In addition to helping to regulate blood sugar and bowel function, soluble fiber is thought to have an anti-inflammatory affect that may help diabetics recover faster from infections.
The recommended daily intake for fiber is 28 to 35 grams a day. For carb-counting purposes, one medium-size apple has about 60 calories and 15 grams of carbohydrate. A skinned apple is still good for you, but with skin an apple provides 4 grams of fiber – about 20 percent of the recommended total daily intake of fiber.
It’s not yet clear if cinnamon is good for diabetes. Research findings have been mixed, and the American Diabetes Association dismisses cinnamon’s use in diabetes treatment.
Several small studies have linked cinnamon to better blood sugar levels. Some of this work shows it may curb blood sugar by lowering insulin resistance.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 117
Protein: 1g
Carbohydrates: 24g
Fat: 2g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 3mg
Sodium: 29mg
Fiber: 3g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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Fresh Tomato and Clam Sauce

Fresh Tomato and Clam Sauce with Whole Grain Linguini takes a bit of time to prepare, but the taste and the nutritional benefit outweigh the prep time.

Fresh Tomato and Clam Sauce Prep Time: 20 min (after purging clams)
Cook Time: 30 min
Ready In: 50 min

Servings: 4

Ingredients
3 dozen (36) Littleneck Clams (see Tips & Notes below)
2 tbsp Olive Oil
5 cloves Garlic, chopped
½ cup Red Bell Pepper, chopped
4 cups fresh Tomatoes, peeled and chopped
3 tbsp fresh Parsley, chopped
1 tbsp fresh Basil, chopped
¼ tsp Salt
¼ tsp Red Pepper Flakes
½ tsp Oregano
½ cup Dry White Wine
8 oz Whole-grain Linguini

Directions
Heat olive oil, garlic and red pepper in a deep skillet.
Add chopped tomatoes, parsley, basil, salt, red pepper flakes and oregano, bring to quick boil, then reduce heat and simmer 15 to 20 minutes.
Stir in white wine; add clams on top of tomato sauce. Cover and steam until clams open. (Discard any clams that do not open; they are not suitable for eating.)
Meanwhile, boil water and cook pasta to al dente.
Serve tomato sauce and clams over pasta.

Tips & Notes
Before preparing this dish (preferably several hours or more), place clams in bowl of cold water with handful of cornmeal added; keep refrigerated. (This will help purge clams of any sand or other debris.) When ready to cook, rinse and scrub clams.
This recipe works well with canned clams if you are unable to get fresh. Canned clams are quite high in sodium, which will need to be taken into consideration. If using canned clams, you will need 1 (8 ounce) can of minced clams and 1 (10 ounce) can of whole clams. Reserve the clam juice and add to the sauce.
Clams are surprisingly high in iron. So high, in fact, that T-bone steaks and beef liver don’t compare. A 3 ounce serving of cooked clams, or about nine small clams, has about 24 milligrams of iron.
That’s more iron than recommended each day for most adults (iron RDA is 18 milligrams per day for pre-menopausal women and eight milligrams per day for adult men and post-menopausal women.)
Some individuals, especially women, have a difficult time getting enough iron each day, resulting in anemia if not treated. If you suffer from low iron, eating clams occasionally will help maintain your iron stores.
On the other hand, some individuals absorb too much iron or get too much iron from the foods they eat.
For these people, eating clams often may be a problem. The minerals in clams doesn’t stop with iron. Clams are a good source of phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese and selenium, as well.
If you are getting tired of eating oily fish each week to meet recommendations, add clams to your recipe rotation a few times a month because clams contain a fair amount of omega-3 fatty acids.
Clams qualify as a lean protein at more than 20 grams of protein and less than two grams of fat in a three-ounce serving. Clams have more protein than oysters and scallops, but roughly the same protein and fat content as chicken.
Clams contain fair amounts of cholesterol. There is nothing special about the cholesterol found in seafood like clams and shrimp. The reason seafood isn’t prohibited for people with high cholesterol has more to do with the low fat and saturated-fat content of seafood like clams.
Eating a low saturated-fat diet is much more important in maintaining healthy blood cholesterol than eating a low-cholesterol diet.

Nutritional Information Per Serving
Calories: 361
Protein: 13g
Carbohydrates: 60g
Fat: 8g
Saturated Fat: 1g
Cholesterol: 7mg
Sodium: 356mg
Fiber: 8g

Source: NetPlaces.com

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